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Curriculum

Learn more about Kendall Hospital's Anesthesiology Residency Program curriculum and rotation schedule.

Structure of the CA1 Year

The structure of the CA1 year involves 13 four-week rotations. During the first six weeks (entire first rotation and half of the second rotation) residents will receive a structured orientation to both the hospital and department, including policies and procedures.

The orientation will also include formal lecture, small group sessions and simulations covering basic topics of anesthesia, such as the anesthesia machine, common medications, pre-operative assessment and technical skills such as intubation, mask ventilation and central line placement.

During this six-week period, residents will initially be supervised by faculty one on one and incrementally increase the time spent in the operating room and decrease the amount of time the attending is with them during the maintenance of anesthesia. The resident's readiness to be alone, under indirect supervision, for significant amounts of time during the maintenance of anesthesia will be assessed by an OSCE assessment done between the fourth and sixth week of orientation.

CA1 rotations will focus on learning the art and science of delivering anesthetics to patients that do not have significantly complicated medical histories or scheduled for complicated surgical procedures. Residents will also start some subspecialty rotations based on their progression throughout the year.

The rotations are as follows:

  • General anesthesia
  • Obstetric anesthesia
  • PACU
  • Preoperative assessment
  • Pain (Chronic, Regional or Acute pain)
  • ICU
  • Trauma/Burns
  • Neuroanesthesia
  • Emergency Medicine (if not completed in CBY)

Goals of the CA1 Year

By the end of the CA1 year, the anesthesia resident is expected to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in pre-anesthetic assessment, preoperative preparation and medication, intraoperative management and post-anesthetic care of patients with a variety of medical conditions presenting for minor to moderately complex surgical procedures.
  2. Develop a working knowledge of physiology, pharmacology, equipment, medicine and surgery in order to provide safe and effective anesthesia for uncomplicated and minimally complicated patients presenting for minor to moderately complex surgical procedures.

Structure of the CA2 Year

The structure of the CA2 year involves 13 four-week rotations. The rotations focus on the various subspecialties in anesthesia. Residents during this year are expected to develop their skills to operate with indirect supervision.

The rotations are as follows:

  • Pediatric anesthesia
  • Obstetric anesthesia
  • Cardiac anesthesia
  • Neuroanesthesia
  • Pain (Chronic, Acute or Regional)
  • ICU
  • Advanced Clinical

Goals of the CA2 Year:

By the end of the CA2 year, the anesthesia resident is expected to:

  1. Demonstrate competence in pre-anesthetic assessment, preoperative preparation and medication, intraoperative management and post-anesthetic care of patients in a number of subspecialties:
    • Cardiothoracic anesthesia
    • Neuroanesthesia
    • Obstetric anesthesia
    • Pediatric anesthesia
    • Regional anesthesia
  2. Demonstrate advanced technical skills in areas such as airway management, venous and arterial cannulation and neuraxial techniques, among others
  3. Demonstrate competence in the anesthesia specialties of intensive care and chronic, as well as acute and cancer-related, pain management